FAQ

FAQ

Here are the frequently asked questions and the answers (FAQ). If you can’t find your answers, please feel free to contact us.

What does BEST stand for?
BEST is the acronym of four words – Balanced, Empathic, Skillful and Terrific. We use a balanced way of yin and yang to restore your health, and we are empathic and skillful to ensure that you have a terrific experience in our clinic.

What does a Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture appointment involve?
A typical appointment involves an extended consultation where questions will be asked and your tongue and pulse will be assessed. Questions will detail your health, family histories and other things we may need to get a full picture of your health. Treatment is then administered according to what we think you may need – Acupuncture, Cupping, Chinese Medicine, etc, or a combination of them. Please allow 60-90 minutes for the first visit depending on complexity, and 40-60 minutes for return visits.

All you need to bring is yourself and any relevant reports (X-ray and imagine reports, tests done from your doctor etc). Please try to come in something comfortable and loose (we may need access to your arms and legs, so something you can fold up would be perfect).

Is Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine covered by Private Health Insurance?
Yes, if you have extras/ancillary cover on your private health insurance, acupuncture and Chinese Medicine consults are covered. How much you get back will depend on your level of cover with your health insurance provider. Electronic claiming facility is available so you can claim on the spot if you have insurance card, or an invoice will be provided for you to send in.

What kind of treatment do I need ?
This will be determined when you come to the clinic and will be based on the diagnosis you will be given. Your opinion will at all times be respected, and you will only receive a treatment you feel comfortable with.

How long does treatment take?
For the initial consultation and treatment, it may take 1 hour. Subsequent visits about 30~45 min for treatments. If you come only for herbs, it takes about 10 to 20 minutes.

Does acupuncture hurt?
No. Really, it doesn’t. There should be no sharp or stinging pain you normally associate with needles. Different sensations such as soreness, numbness, distending, heaviness and warmth may be felt, but the energetic sensation differs from pain. People often comment that the feeling is unfamiliar but pleasant and relaxing.

What if I don’t like needles?
We do suggest to try it to see first, it’s really nothing to worry about and it’s actually very relaxing. There are other therapies used by Dr. Wu that do not involve needles, such as Cupping, Moxibusion, Acupressure, Gua-sha (spooning). And many conditions can be treated with herbal medicine and dietary advice so this is an option.

How many treatments are needed? and how often?
The response to treatment will depend on the severity and duration of your condition, as well as your age, general health and other factors. It is not uncommon to feel better after your first treatment, and noticeable improvement is generally seen within three to four treatments; however long term, chronic conditions will generally require a longer treatment course. A treatment plan will be discussed with you on your first visit and you will be fully informed every step of the way.

As for the frequency, for acute conditions you may need two sessions a week, and for general conditions we suggest once or twice a week at early beginning in order to achieve the quickest response from your body. As your condition improves, treatment is reduced to once a week or per fortnight. The duration between treatments becomes longer until your condition is resolved and you no longer require treatment. Certain conditions may require treatment to be arranged around the stages and phases of the body (eg. fertility & IVF).

Does Chinese Medicine suit all ages and people?
Yes. Chinese medicine effectively treats people from all ages, pregnant women and people with disabilities. There are different therapies we used, and you will receive those suit you best.

Can/should I come to your clinic if unwell with a cold or flu?
Yes. Many people think that they should not schedule an acupuncture treatment when they are sick with a cold or flu, but this is actually a good time to come, since acupuncture and herbal medicine as well as cupping/spooning can help speed recovery.

How about my medications?
In most cases, there is no problems in having Chinese Medicine along with your prescription medication. It is a good idea to give a list of your medication to us so that we will arrange your treatment to suit.

Is there anything I should or should not do before my appointment?
There are a few Dos and Don’ts to follow before your acupuncture treatment:

  • Don’t eat a heavy meal right before your appointment. However, Do make sure you have eaten a meal earlier in the day. It is best neither hungry nor too full before having an acupuncture treatment.
  • Don’t exhaust yourself immediately before your appointment.
  • Don’t brush or scrape your tongue coating when you brush your teeth before your appointment, as Dr. Wu may want to examine your tongue.
  • Don’t drink anything that may color your tongue coating before your appointment, such as coffee, soda, or juice. However, Do stay hydrated by drinking water or tea, as neither of these affect the color of the tongue.
  • Do try to come to the appointment in a relaxed state of mind so as to help your body accept the treatment to the best. Loose, comfortable clothing that provides easy access to torso, arms and legs is most desirable.
Can acupuncture be used as preventative medicine?
Yes. Chinese medicine has been well-known for prevention of disease. Research has now verified that acupuncture stimulates immune system, which can increase your resistance to bacterial and viral infection. Acupuncture increases overall energy and vitality, and it helps the body respond to injury and stress. Regular, monthly treatments can help you maintain good health and a sense of well-being.